Search Results

Showing results 1 to 100 from 252

Lecture seven: Marxism, art and the Soviet debate over “proletarian culture”

By David Walsh, 30 September 2005

The following is the first part of the lecture “Marxism, art and the Soviet debate over ‘proletarian culture’.” It was delivered by David Walsh, the arts editor of the World Socialist Web Site, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It will appear in four parts. (See Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4)

The coming grand coalition in Germany: illegitimate and undemocratic

By Partei für Soziale Gleichheit (Socialist Equality Party), 30 September 2005

The grand coalition being prepared by Germany’s Union parties (Christian Democratic Union—CDU, Christian Social Union—CSU) and the Social Democratic Party (SPD) is undemocratic and illegitimate. Such a government will pursue policies in the interests of German big business and the rich—the same policies that were decisively rejected by the overwhelming majority of the German electorate on September 18.

Lurid reports of rape, murder in Katrina’s aftermath exposed as frauds

By Joseph Kay, 30 September 2005

A series of articles over the past week have confirmed that the widespread reports of massive looting, murder and violence in hurricane-devastated New Orleans were either concocted out of whole cloth or grossly exaggerated. In the first several days after New Orleans was inundated, these stories were disseminated by government officials at the federal, state and local level, and trumpeted by the media in banner headlines and lurid TV accounts.

Hurricanes’ destruction deepens US farm crisis

By Jerry Isaacs, 30 September 2005

In addition to the impact on the US economy from rising fuel prices, hurricanes Katrina and Rita have dealt a critical blow to American agriculture, which is already reeling from the worst drought in the midwestern states in nearly three decades.

Chinese government crackdown exposes fraud of local elections

By John Chan, 30 September 2005

A protracted police crackdown on villagers in Taishi, near the southern city of Guangzhou, has revealed the worthlessness of the Chinese government’s promises to extend democratic rights at the local level in rural areas.

Jobless claims, an end to the housing bubble: storm signals for US economy

By John Levine, 30 September 2005

On Monday, September 26, in a speech to the American Bankers Association Annual Convention, Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan made unusually grave warnings about the risks to the economy resulting from a fall in housing prices.

Workers Struggles: Europe, Middle East & Africa

By , 30 September 2005

Europe

US to resume Guantánamo trial of David Hicks

By Richard Phillips, 30 September 2005

With full support from the Australian government, the Bush administration announced last week that it plans to recommence its military commission trial of 30-year-old Australian citizen David Hicks, who has been incarcerated in Guantánamo Bay for almost four years. The initial hearings are expected to begin on November 18 and the trial itself sometime early next year.

Pentagon dismisses new report on US military torture in Iraq

By Kate Randall, 30 September 2005

A report from Human Rights Watch (HRW) provides chilling new details of the torture of Iraqi detainees by US forces. The report, issued September 24—“Leadership Failure: Firsthand Accounts of Torture of Iraqi Detainees by the US Army’s 82nd Airborne Division”—is based on interviews with a US Army captain and two sergeants. It details abuse carried out at Forward Operating Base Mercury (FOB Mercury), near Fallajuh in Central Iraq, from 2003 through 2004.

Lecture seven: Marxism, art and the Soviet debate over “proletarian culture”

By David Walsh, 30 September 2005

This lecture was delivered by David Walsh, the arts editor of the World Socialist Web Site, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Britain: Gate Gourmet strike betrayed by Transport and General Workers Union

By our reporter, 30 September 2005

On September 28, the Transport and General Workers Union and management at the US-owned Gate Gourmet airline caterers reached a deal to end the six-week dispute between the company and its workers at London’s Heathrow Airport.

Rapper Kanye West on the cover of Time: Will rap music shed its “gangster” disguise?

By Kevin Kearney, 30 September 2005

The image of Kanye West crouching down with one hand on his head—clad in designer clothes and sneakers—and the contrived facial expression of one who wishes to be considered a deep thinker adorns the cover of the August 29 issue of Time magazine. The headline of the article reads: “More GQ than gangsta, Kanye West is challenging the way rap thinks about race and class—and striking a chord with fans of all stripes.”

Britain: de Menezes’ parents demand police stand trial for murder

By Julie Hyland, 29 September 2005

The parents of Brazilian worker Jean Charles de Menezes have reiterated their demand that the police officers responsible for killing their son stand trial for murder. They have also called for Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair to stand trial.

Posada Carriles to stay in US: Washington shields CIA terrorist from prosecution

By Bill Van Auken, 29 September 2005

An immigration judge in El Paso, Texas ruled on Tuesday that the CIA-trained anti-Castro Cuban terrorist Luis Posada Carriles cannot be deported to Venezuela, where he is a citizen and is wanted for mass murder, on the grounds that he could face torture there.

Court case hits attack on evolution in Pennsylvania

By Joseph Kay, 29 September 2005

A major court case involving the attack on the teaching of evolution in schools began this week. Eleven parents of children in Dover, Pennsylvania are challenging the decision by the Dover School Board to require biology teachers to question the theory of evolution.

Former Australian Labor leader’s recriminations expose deep political decay

By Mike Head, 29 September 2005

Former Australian Labor Party (ALP) leader Mark Latham’s newly-published The Latham Diaries have provided another damning picture of Australian parliamentary politics after two decades in which both major parties, Labor and Liberal, have sought to impose the free-market agenda of corporate capitalism on an increasingly hostile population.

One-day general strike in India exposes need for socialist-internationalist strategy

By Wije Dias and Socialist Equality Party presidential candidate in Sri Lanka, 29 September 2005

Tens of millions of workers in India, both those employed by the state and by the private sector, will join a one-day general strike today to protest against the neo-liberal policies being implemented by the Congress-led United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government.

US and EU-3 make another provocative move against Iran

By Peter Symonds, 29 September 2005

The Bush administration and its European allies moved one step closer to an open confrontation with Iran, following last Saturday’s decision by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) board to declare Tehran in breach of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). The resolution sets the stage for Iran to be referred to the UN Security Council for punitive sanctions if it fails to shut down its uranium enrichment program, to allow intrusive new inspections of its nuclear facilities and “reconsider” the construction of a heavy water research reactor.

Sri Lankan SEP presidential candidate to address Colombo election meeting

By , 29 September 2005

Wije Dias, the Socialist Equality Party (SEP) candidate in the November 17 Sri Lankan presidential elections, will speak at the first public meeting of the party’s election campaign next week. Dias is SEP General Secretary and a member of the World Socialist Web Site editorial board.

House Republican leader indicted in campaign finance conspiracy

By Patrick Martin, 29 September 2005

In a serious blow to the Bush administration and the congressional Republican leadership, Congressman Tom DeLay stepped down as House Majority Leader Wednesday after he was indicted by a Texas grand jury on charges of conspiracy to violate state election laws.

Lecture six: Socialism in one country or permanent revolution

By Bill Van Auken, 29 September 2005

The following is the third and final part of the lecture “Socialism in one country or permanent revolution.” It was delivered by Bill Van Auken at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture is being posted in three parts. Part 1 was posted September 27; Part 2 was posted September 28.

German election data highlight social divisions

By Dietmar Henning, 29 September 2005

A close examination of the results of the German election held on September 18 reveals the extent of the social and political divide in the country.

Germany: SPD and union parties prepare for grand coalition

By Peter Schwarz, 28 September 2005

Ten days after the German national elections, it appears that a grand coalition of the conservative parties—the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and Christian Social Union (CSU)—with the Social Democratic Party (SPD) is emerging in Berlin. Prominent representatives of all three parties have spoken in favor of such a solution.

Lecture six: Socialism in one country or permanent revolution

By Bill Van Auken, 28 September 2005

The following is the second part of the lecture “Socialism in one country or permanent revolution.” It was delivered by Bill Van Auken at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture is being posted in three parts. Part 1 was posted September 27.

After September 24 protest: What way forward in the struggle against war?

By Bill Van Auken, 28 September 2005

The massive march in Washington on September 24 for the immediate withdrawal of US troops from Iraq was followed two days later by a smaller civil disobedience protest in front of the White House where scores were arrested.

War protestors acquitted on federal conspiracy charges in New York

By Daniel Renfrew, 28 September 2005

Four war protestors charged with conspiracy in federal court here were acquitted Monday after over seven hours of jury deliberations. While they were convicted on lesser misdemeanor charges, the verdict was a clear blow to the government’s campaign to suppress dissent and nonviolent protest against the Iraq war.

Sri Lankan military threatens antiwar filmmakers

By Nanda Wickramasinghe, 28 September 2005

Over past two weeks, senior officers in the Sri Lankan armed forces have issued a series of barely disguised threats against filmmakers who through their works have been critical of the military and the country’s protracted civil war. As well as being a flagrant breach of democratic rights and a direct intervention by the “neutral” armed forces into political life, these actions are a clear warning that the military top brass is preparing for war.

What was the British SAS doing in Basra?

By Chris Marsden, 28 September 2005

The September 19 arrest of two undercover Special Air Service officers in Basra, traveling in an unmarked car containing weapons and explosives, has led to numerous accusations that they were acting as agents provocateurs.

US military intensifies campaign of intimidation prior to Iraqi referendum

By James Cogan, 28 September 2005

The US-led occupation forces in Iraq are widening the campaign of repression being carried out against sections of the population who are expected to vote “No” in the October 15 referendum called to ratify a draft constitution.

Valuable films from France

By David Walsh, 28 September 2005

This is the second of a series of articles devoted to the recent Toronto film festival.

An interview with Alain Tasma, director of October 17, 1961

By David Walsh, 28 September 2005

David Walsh and Joanne Laurier spoke with French director Alain Tasma in Toronto.

Indian prime minister cements relations with Afghanistan’s puppet regime

By Deepal Jayasekera and Kranti Kumara, 28 September 2005

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh made a two-day official visit to Afghanistan in late August as part of an aggressive attempt by the Indian ruling elite to realise their strategic ambitions in south and central Asia. These ambitions include containing traditional rival Pakistan and using Afghanistan as a “land-bridge” to the oil reserves and markets of the former central Asian republics of the Soviet Union.

Bush administration to expand military powers, attack social programs

By Joseph Kay, 27 September 2005

Less than a month after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and parts of Mississippi, and only a few days after Hurricane Rita hit Texas and Louisiana, the Bush administration is using these disasters as a pretext to expand the domestic role of the military, attack social programs, and further enrich a tiny layer of the population.

German court declares Iraq war violated international law

By Justus Leicht, 27 September 2005

Just a few weeks ago, a highly significant judicial decision was handed down by the German Federal Administrative Court but barely mentioned in the German media. With careful reasoning, the judges ruled that the assault launched by the United States and its allies against Iraq was a clear war of aggression that violated international law.

Lecture six: Socialism in one country or permanent revolution

By Bill Van Auken, 27 September 2005

The following is the first part of the lecture “Socialism in one country or permanent revolution.” It was delivered by Bill Van Auken at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (See Part 2 and Part 3).

California National Guard investigated for domestic spying

By Marge Holland, 27 September 2005

The California National Guard has been under investigation both by the State of California and by the Army Inspector General’s office for misusing allocated funds to create domestic surveillance units and spy on antiwar protestors.

South Africa: factional warfare within ANC coalition

By Barbara Slaughter, 27 September 2005

A serious political crisis has erupted in South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC), culminating in the sacking of the country’s deputy president, Jacob Zuma.

Lecture six: Socialism in one country or permanent revolution

By Bill Van Auken, 27 September 2005

This lecture was delivered by Bill Van Auken at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

German election result causes consternation in the French political establishment

By Antoine Lerougetel, 27 September 2005

The failure of Angela Merkel to achieve a decisive breakthrough for the conservative Christian Democratic Union in the German general election has come as a profound shock to the entire French political establishment. The opposition of the German working class to the imposition of neo-liberal policies and the dismantling of the welfare state is a continuation of the same resistance shown in the rejection of the European constitution by 55 percent of the French voters on May 29 of this year.

An exchange on the German Greens

By Peter Schwarz, 27 September 2005

The following is a letter from a reader on “German Green leader clears way for collaboration with the right”, posted September 24, followed by a reply by the article’s author, Peter Schwarz.

FBI murders Puerto Rican independence figure

By Bill Van Auken, 27 September 2005

The fatal September 23 shooting of Puerto Rican nationalist leader Filiberto Ojeda Rios represents an act of state terror and cold-blooded murder by the US government. It is one more proof that in the name of a “global war on terrorism,” Washington has arrogated to itself the right to conduct political assassinations and act as judge, jury and executioner against opponents of US policies and interests.

Workers Struggles: The Americas

By , 27 September 2005

Latin America

Down in the hole

By Emanuele Saccarelli, 27 September 2005

I am not scared, directed by Gabriele Salvatores, screenplay by Francesca Marciano and Niccolò Ammaniti, based on the novel by Ammaniti

“Liberating the wealthy”: the legacy of New Zealand Labour leader David Lange

By John Braddock, 27 September 2005

Former New Zealand Prime Minister David Lange died from renal failure in Auckland’s Middlemore Hospital on August 13. He was 63 years old and had been in poor health for some time, suffering from an incurable blood condition.

Australian government rams through Telstra privatisation

By Terry Cook, 27 September 2005

After weeks of political turmoil, the Howard government pushed legislation (Transition to Full Private Ownership Bill) through both houses of parliament on September 14-15 authorising the sale of its remaining 51.8 percent share in the communications corporation Telstra.

Letters from our readers

By , 26 September 2005

The following is a selection of recent letters to the World Socialist Web Site.

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 26 September 2005

This is the fifth and final part of the lecture “World War I: The breakdown of capitalism”. It was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (See Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4).

US atrocities in Vietnam documented: Winter Soldier re-released three decades later

By Clare Hurley, 26 September 2005

Winter Soldier, a documentary film by Winterfilm. First released in 1972, re-released by Milestone Films, 2005.

Massive Washington march demands end to war in Iraq

By a WSWS reporting team, 26 September 2005

Hundreds of thousands of people poured through the streets of Washington on Saturday in a march called to demand the immediate withdrawal of all US troops from Iraq. The march, the largest seen in the US capital since the invasion in March 2003, was swelled by both mounting opposition to the illegal war and outrage over the Bush administration’s gross neglect and indifference toward the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Schwarzenegger announces 2006 run for governor

By Andrea Peters, 26 September 2005

California Republican Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger announced September 15 that he will run for reelection in 2006. Schwarzenegger’s decision to declare his candidacy in next year’s race is an attempt to reverse his sagging political fortunes, shore up confidence among big business, and preempt the growth of opposition to his administration within the Republican Party.

Chinese leadership plans to honour ousted party “reformer”

By John Chan, 26 September 2005

The General Office of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Central Committee issued a plan last month to officially mark the 90th anniversary of the birth of former party secretary Hu Yaobang on November 20.

Iraq: a reactionary call for “war” on Shiites

By James Cogan, 26 September 2005

A recent audio statement in which Al Qaeda declared “an all-out war” against Iraq’s majority Shiite population graphically illustrates both the reactionary character of Islamic fundamentalism and the living hell that the US occupation has inflicted on the Iraqi people.

Hurricane Rita causes widespread damage but few deaths

By Patrick Martin, 26 September 2005

Hurricane Rita cut a swathe of destruction across southwestern Louisiana and parts of east Texas Saturday, but no deaths were reported in the coastal areas of either state because of a near-total evacuation of the affected regions. After several dozen deaths during the pre-storm evacuation in Texas, the first 36 hours after Rita made landfall saw only a single death reported, from a tornado in Mississippi, far from the main impact of the hurricane.

Tens of thousands march in London against Iraq occupation

By our reporters, 26 September 2005

Tens of thousands took part in a one-hour march through London called by the Stop the War Coalition, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and the Muslim Association of Britain.

Australian voters speak of concerns and discontent

By our correspondents, 24 September 2005

World Socialist Web Site reporters spoke to voters outside polling booths in the electorates of Marrickville, Maroubra and Macquarie Fields in last Saturday’s by-elections in the Australian state of New South Wales.

German Green leader clears way for collaboration with the right

By Peter Schwarz, 24 September 2005

On Tuesday, September 20, German foreign minister Joschka Fischer announced his withdrawal from the leadership of the German Green Party. Following the defeat of the Greens along with the Social Democrats (SPD) in the German elections September 17, he is seeking a new political home for himself and his party.

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 24 September 2005

This is the fourth part of the lecture “World War I: The breakdown of capitalism”. It was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture will appear in five instalments. (See Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 5).

Workers Struggles: Asia, Australia and the Pacific

By , 24 September 2005

At least 32 people killed in factory blast in India

Arrest of Bush official sheds light on corruption and cronyism

By David Walsh, 24 September 2005

The arrest of the chief federal procurement official, David Safavian, threatens to lift the lid slightly on the cesspool of corruption that is the Bush administration and the army of well-heeled lobbyists, corporate executives, right-wing ideologues and Christian fundamentalists that swarm around it.

Britain: asylum detainee commits suicide

By Steve James, 24 September 2005

The suicide of asylum-seeker Manuel Bravo expresses, just as sharply as the “shoot to kill” policy operational on the streets of London, the vicious social policy being implemented by the Labour government in the interests of a narrow layer of the super rich.

US airlines follow bankruptcy filings with mass layoffs

By John Levine, 24 September 2005

Eight days after declaring bankruptcy, Delta Air Lines announced it will cut as many as 9,000 jobs, or 17 percent of its 52,000 employees. The new layoffs are in addition to the 24,000 job cuts the company has implemented over the last four years. By the time the latest round of downsizing is completed, Delta, the third largest carrier in the US, will have eliminated 39 percent of its workforce since 2001.

Hurricane Rita slams Texas and Louisiana, reflooding New Orleans

By Patrick Martin, 24 September 2005

Nearly 30 people died in hurricane-related accidents even before Hurricane Rita came ashore early Saturday near the Texas-Louisiana border. The huge storm, with hurricane winds along a 350-mile stretch of coastline, threatens a devastating blow to Houston, Texas, the fourth largest US city, as well as severe damage to flood-ravaged New Orleans.

On the Hurricane Katrina disaster

By , 24 September 2005

The following is a selection of letters sent to the World Socialist Web Site on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

Australia: NSW by-elections another sign of political volatility

By Richard Phillips, 24 September 2005

In by-elections held last weekend in Sydney, the Labor government in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) retained control of all three seats—Maroubra, Marrickville and Macquarie Fields.

War protesters tried on federal conspiracy charges in New York

By Daniel Renfrew, 23 September 2005

Four Catholic activists went on trial this week in the upstate New York town of Binghamton, the first antiwar protestors to be indicted on federal conspiracy charges since the Vietnam War era.

Workers Struggles: Europe, Middle East & Africa

By , 23 September 2005

Europe

Katrina, the Iraq war and the struggle for socialism

By Socialist Equality Party, 23 September 2005

The following statement is being distributed by supporters of the Socialist Equality Party and the World Socialist Web Site at the antiwar demonstrations being held Saturday, September 24, in Washington DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. At the main demonstration in Washington, the SEP/WSWS will be setting up literature tables in the southwest segment of the Ellipse and at the Washington Monument. The statement is available as a PDF, which we encourage WSWS readers to download and distribute.

Texas and Louisiana coast menaced by Hurricane Rita

By Joseph Kay, 23 September 2005

Hurricane Rita is the second giant storm in three weeks to threaten the United States along the Gulf Coast. The same basic features of American society that so shocked the nation and the world following Hurricane Katrina are again on display: the enormous social inequality, the decay of public infrastructure, the indifference, incompetence and lack of preparation of the American ruling elite.

Blair and Murdoch defend Bush over Hurricane Katrina

By Chris Marsden, 23 September 2005

Rupert Murdoch inadvertently performed a public service when he cited an attack by Prime Minister Tony Blair on the BBC’s coverage of Hurricane Katrina in which Blair described the network’s reporting as “full of hate” for America.

Canada: Parti Québécois thrown into unexpected leadership race

By Guy Charron, 23 September 2005

Last June’s surprise resignation of Bernard Landry as leader of the Parti Québécois (PQ) has forced the PQ—the big business, pro-indépendantiste party that has alternated with the Liberal Party of Québec in forming Quebec’s provincial government for the past three decades—into an unexpected leadership race whose outcome is highly uncertain.

Sri Lankan presidential candidate condemns Bush’s treatment of hurricane victims

By our correspondent, 23 September 2005

The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka held a media conference on Tuesday at the Hotel Nippon in central Colombo to announce its candidate, Wije Dias, for the presidential election on November 17.

World cinema and the world’s problems

By David Walsh, 23 September 2005

This is the first of a series of articles devoted to the recent Toronto film festival.

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 23 September 2005

This is the third part of the lecture “World War I: The breakdown of capitalism”. It was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture will appear in five parts. (See Part 1, Part 2, Part 4 and Part 5).

Democrats cave on reactionary chief justice: Senate panel rubberstamps Roberts nomination

By Patrick Martin, 23 September 2005

By a vote of 13-5, the Senate Judiciary Committee ratified the nomination of right-wing jurist John Roberts to be the next chief justice of the US Supreme Court. Three of the eight Democrats on the panel—Patrick Leahy of Vermont, and Russ Feingold and Herbert Kohl, both of Wisconsin—joined with a unanimous Republican majority to endorse Roberts, whose confirmation by the full Senate is now effectively assured.

The Bush administration backtracks on North Korea

By Peter Symonds, 22 September 2005

Despite Washington’s efforts to dress up the outcome as a win, the six-party agreement on North Korea’s nuclear program reached in Beijing on Monday is a significant backdown by the Bush administration. Embroiled in a deepening quagmire in Iraq and a political crisis at home over Hurricane Katrina, the White House has sought to take North Korea off the agenda, temporarily at least, by agreeing to a general statement of principles that previously it would have emphatically rejected.

Letters on the SEP/WSWS Summer School

By , 22 September 2005

The following are a selection of letters sent to the World Socialist Web Site on the series of lectures given at the Summer School of the Socialist Equality Party and WSWS.

British government announces new attacks on civil liberties

By Robert Stevens, 22 September 2005

On September 15, Home Secretary Charles Clarke announced details of the proposed draft Terrorism Bill that represents a fundamental attack on democratic rights and civil liberties. The government plans to push the bill through Parliament as soon as Christmas.

General Motors slashes jobs in Australia

By Terry Cook, 22 September 2005

Many hundreds of jobs are being shed throughout Australia’s car industry in the wake of General Motors Holden’s decision to close down the third shift at its assembly plant at Elizabeth, an outer suburb of Adelaide in South Australia. GM Holden will axe up to 1,000 jobs by December and another 400 by the middle of next year, reducing the workforce at Australia’s largest carmaker to about 4,300. Production at Elizabeth will be cut from 800 units daily to 620.

What next after the German election?

By Ulrich Rippert, 22 September 2005

Ulrich Rippert, national secretary of the Partei für Soziale Gleichheit (PSG—Socialist Equality Party of Germany) and a member of the World Socialist Web Site Editorial Board, stood as a PSG candidate in Berlin in last Sunday’s national election.

US Federal Reserve hikes interest rates

By Bill Van Auken, 22 September 2005

Confounding predictions by many financial analysts and brushing aside pleas from some politicians, the US Federal Reserve Board dismissed the economic impact of the Hurricane Katrina disaster and imposed yet another incremental hike in interest rates.

Canadian government defends intelligence extracted through torture

By Keith Jones, 22 September 2005

The Canadian government told a public inquiry last week that barring Canadian security forces from acting on information obtained through torture would place Canadian lives at unwarranted risk.

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 22 September 2005

This is the second part of the lecture “World War I: The breakdown of capitalism”. It was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture will appear in five parts. (See Part 1, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5).

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 21 September 2005

This lecture was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

New York City police attack Cindy Sheehan at antiwar rally

By Bill Van Auken, 21 September 2005

New York City police officers broke up an antiwar rally Monday in the midst of a speech by Cindy Sheehan, whose son Casey was killed in Iraq in April 2004.

Mamdouh Habib, former Guantánamo Bay prisoner, speaks with the WSWS

By Richard Phillips, 21 September 2005

Until his release without charge in late January this year, 49-year-old Australian citizen Mamdouh Habib was among the more than five hundred men incarcerated as “enemy combatants” in the US government’s military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

Hurricane Katrina: a public health and environmental disaster

By John Levine, 21 September 2005

Besides the devastation Hurricane Katrina has caused directly along the coast of Louisiana and Mississippi, the long-term environmental and health impact of the storm will be severe. Particularly in the city of New Orleans, the immediate destruction is compounded by the effects of pollution and disease.

World War I: The breakdown of capitalism

By Nick Beams, 21 September 2005

This is the first part of the lecture “World War I: The breakdown of capitalism”. It was delivered by Nick Beams, the national secretary of the Socialist Equality Party of Australia and a member of the WSWS Editorial Board, at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The lecture will appear in five parts. (See Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5).

Sri Lanka: the JHU-Rajapakse deal and the reactionary role of Buddhist supremacism

By Wije Dias (Socialist Equality Party presidential candidate), 21 September 2005

Mahinda Rajapakse, Sri Lanka’s prime minister and presidential candidate for the Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP), signed a election deal last week with the Jathika Hela Urumaya (JHU), a Sinhala supremacist party under the leadership of right-wing Buddhist monks.

International press pours scorn on German voters

By Peter Schwarz, 21 September 2005

The international press has reacted to the German parliamentary (Bundestag) election held on Sunday with a mixture of horror and indignation. The message given by voters was clearly understood. The result expressed a rejection of the policies of welfare cuts and “free market” reforms which are currently being pursued by all European governments.

British troops in pitched battle in Basra

By Chris Marsden and Julie Hyland, 21 September 2005

Bloody conflict between British forces and Shiite civilians, police and militias has exposed the myth of Iraqi sovereignty and confirmed that the British Army acts as a colonial occupier.

Socialist Equality Party receives over 15,000 votes in German elections

By Ludwig Niethammer, 21 September 2005

The Partei für Soziale Gleichheit (Socialist Equality Party of Germany) won a total of 15,365 votes in the German parliamentary (Bundestag) election held on September 18. The PSG stood candidates in four of Germany’s sixteen states.

Could we cover our ears to keep from screaming?

By Kartikeya Saboo, 21 September 2005

White Noise, a film by Vinta Nanda

Families of fallen US soldiers: “We are on a mission—we don’t want any more dead”

By Samuel Davidson, 20 September 2005

One of the three legs of the “Bring Them Home Now Tour” made a stop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 11-13. The bus tour includes participants of “Camp Casey,” the nearly month-long protest held last month outside George W. Bush’s Crawford, Texas, vacation home. Cindy Sheehan, whose son Casey was killed in Iraq on April 4, 2004, demanded a meeting with the president, which he never granted.

Afghanistan election: a mockery of democracy

By Peter Symonds, 20 September 2005

With the US-led occupation of Iraq sinking further into the quagmire, determined efforts have been made by the Bush administration and the international media to present last Sunday’s parliamentary elections in Afghanistan in the best possible light.

Lecture four: Marxism, history and the science of perspective

By David North, 20 September 2005

This is the sixth and final part of the lecture “Marxism, history and the science of perspective,” delivered by World Socialist Web Site Editorial Board Chairman David North at the Socialist Equality Party/WSWS summer school held August 14 to August 20, 2005 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Part 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were posted September 14-19.

German election: a clear rejection of right-wing policies

By Peter Schwarz, 20 September 2005

The result of the election for the German parliament (Bundestag) on Sunday can be interpreted in only one way: policies based on welfare cuts and the re-division of social wealth to benefit the rich have met with bitter resistance from the German population and been vigorously rejected.

Workers Struggles: The Americas

By , 20 September 2005

Latin America

The decline and decay of Britain’s trade unions

By Chris Marsden, 20 September 2005

This year’s annual conference of the Trades Union Congress was a gathering of the politically desperate.

New storm threat forces resumed evacuation from New Orleans

By Patrick Martin, 20 September 2005

Officials in New Orleans ordered a halt to the return of city residents driven from their homes by Hurricane Katrina, as another hurricane battered the Florida Keys on its way into the Gulf of Mexico, with a potential landfall in Texas or Louisiana by the end of the week.

New Zealand election stalemate exposes deep social divisions

By John Braddock, 20 September 2005

Provisional results from Saturday’s New Zealand elections have put neither of the two major parties, Labour or National, in a position to form a government. The incumbent Labour Party leads by a narrow margin of 23,000 votes with 218,000 special votes still to be counted. As it stands, the result gives Labour 40.7 percent of the vote (50 seats) and National 39.6 percent (49 seats). Both would need to stitch together a shaky coalition with more than one of the minor parties to guarantee the 62 seats needed for a parliamentary majority.