Music

Neil Young’s Homegrown: Time capsule from the 1970s

By Kevin Reed, 4 July 2020

Canadian-born singer-songwriter Neil Young has released Homegrown, 45 years after it was recorded, an album of twelve songs that brings us back to his music of the early 1970s.

The Strokes’ The New Abnormal and Hamilton Leithauser’s The Loves Of Your Life: Two decades on from the rise of “indie rock”

By Matthew Brennan, 23 June 2020

Two of the more notable bands to emerge from the early 2000s “indie rock” music scene, which was centered in New York City, have recently produced new albums.

“It’s bigger than black and white, it’s a problem with the whole way of life”

Rapper Lil Baby’s new single begins to address “The Bigger Picture”

By Elliott Murtagh and J. L’Heureau, 22 June 2020

Atlanta rapper Lil Baby has released a new song about the ongoing protests against racism and police brutality.

Classical musicians face unprecedented challenges amid COVID-19 pandemic

By Fred Mazelis, 15 June 2020

The New York Philharmonic and other orchestras are canceling performances for the rest of this year.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool
Impressive raw material, but a non-committal approach

By Matthew Brennan, 1 June 2020

Few musicians were involved in as many stages of development in jazz, or popular music generally, after World War II as Miles Davis (1926-1991).

“Lost our connection after the war”

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band—a documentary film

By James Brewer, 25 May 2020

Robbie Robertson: “The story of the Band is beautiful. It was so beautiful it went up in flames.”

Social problems begin to come to the fore in Billie Eilish’s debut album

By Elliott Murtagh and J. L’Heureau, 23 May 2020

The 18-year-old pop star’s debut album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, was the most popular album on the planet in 2019.

Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider: The pioneer of electronica (1947-2020)

By Paul Bond, 19 May 2020

The cultural background of a disoriented avant-garde in the aftermath of World War II and the division of Germany helped shape the music of Schneider and his peers.

Fetch the Bolt Cutters: One small step for Fiona Apple

By Erik Schreiber, 15 May 2020

The new album, which resonates during our time of quarantine, reflects the singer’s personal growth, as well as the regressive influences of her Hollywood-celebrity environment.

Beethoven’s opera Fidelio for a new online audience of millions

By Bernd Reinhardt, 14 May 2020

A new staging of Beethoven’s Fidelio is a highlight in these times of lockdown and quarantine.

Tony Allen (1940-2020): Pioneering drummer of Afrobeat dies

By Paul Bond, 13 May 2020

His long-time collaborator Fela Kuti once declared “without Tony Allen, there would be no Afrobeat.”

Rock ’n’ roll great Little Richard dead at 87

By Hiram Lee, 12 May 2020

Little Richard played a significant role in shaping rock ’n’ roll in the 1950s and left an indelible influence on the world of music and pop culture in the decades that followed.

One World: Together At Home—A noble gesture married to official cynicism

By Paul Bond, 30 April 2020

Huge global audience figures show a support for the keyworkers at the frontline that is not answered by any corresponding practical measures from the ruling class.

COVID-19 kills jazz saxophone master Lee Konitz

By John Andrews, 20 April 2020

COVID-19 has claimed the life of Lee Konitz, one of the foremost improvisers of post-war jazz.

Pedro Costa’s Vitalina Varela and the endless night

By Erik Schreiber, 14 April 2020

The newest movie from acclaimed Portuguese director Pedro Costa offers visual beauty, pessimism and little insight or hope.

Country singer-songwriter John Prine dies in pandemic

By Hiram Lee and Matthew Brennan, 13 April 2020

In his art and his very personality, Prine pursued an existence entirely opposed to the sort led by those whose criminal negligence made possible his death from COVID-19.

New York Philharmonic forced to reinstate two musicians victimized by #MeToo campaign

By David Walsh, 11 April 2020

Oboist Liang Wang and trumpeter Matthew Muckey disputed their 2018 firings. An arbitrator heard the case and found that the musicians had been terminated without just cause.

Prominent jazz musicians die in COVID-19 pandemic

By Hiram Lee, 6 April 2020

Among the more than 1.2 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, and the nearly 70,000 lives lost, may be counted those of numerous well-known musicians and performers.

Andrew Bird’s My Finest Work Yet and Ian Noe’s Between the Country

By Matthew Brennan, 31 March 2020

The songwriting and musicality on both, at its best, is unusually direct, serious and invigorating. The two performers attempt to grapple with changes in social life—and social moods—and manage to give them intriguing musical expression.

John Eliot Gardiner leads all nine Beethoven symphonies at Carnegie Hall, and speaks about their significance

The great composer’s music has “to do with social equality, revolution and counterrevolution”

By Fred Mazelis, 23 March 2020

An opportunity, just before the coronavirus forced the closing of concert halls, to hear the works of the master played on period instruments.

Metropolitan Opera in New York ends season, laying off musicians and other staff

By Fred Mazelis, 21 March 2020

Hundreds of employees will be joining tens of millions of others as the coronavirus pandemic leads to skyrocketing unemployment.

An appreciation of jazz pianist McCoy Tyner, 1938-2020

By Matthew Brennan, 16 March 2020

Tyner was the last living member of the famed “classic” John Coltrane quartet, which included bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones.

Right-wing attack on performance of African-American spirituals at Western Michigan University

By Joe Lorenz, 13 March 2020

The concert, “Spirituals: From Ship to Shore,” was organized and led by Dr. John Wesley Wright, an award-winning tenor and professor at Salisbury University in Maryland, as part of a week of study into the history of the musical genre.

Spanish government joins persecution of opera singer Plácido Domingo

By David Walsh, 29 February 2020

The latest stage of the manufactured sexual misconduct controversy surrounding the 79-year-old singer is no more edifying than the earlier ones.

“One must not forget”: A musical tribute in Berlin to Jewish members of the Deutsche Oper orchestra persecuted by the Nazis

By Verena Nees, 21 February 2020

A moving concert paid tribute to four Jewish members of the Deutsche Oper orchestra who were forced into exile or murdered after Hitler came to power in 1933.

“What we think changes how we act.”

Gang of Four guitarist Andy Gill dead at 64

By Erik Schreiber, 19 February 2020

Gill consciously broke with musical convention to develop his own style of guitar playing and to create a distinctive sound for his band. Similarly, he sought to understand the origins of social and political conditions, rather than accepting them as given.

American pianist Peter Serkin is dead at 72

By Fred Mazelis, 5 February 2020

The son of Rudolf Serkin, he was a musician of intelligence, passion and integrity, a solo recitalist and chamber musician, who also performed with orchestras worldwide.

#MeToo accusations and identity politics circulate around 2020 Grammy Awards

By Matthew Brennan, 29 January 2020

The event, hosted by the Recording Academy, is the most prominent such ceremony in the music business in the US. Grammys are handed out to musicians, singers, producers, engineers and songwriters.

Wozzeck at New York’s Metropolitan Opera: Alban Berg’s opera on the tragic fate of an impoverished soldier

By Fred Mazelis, 16 January 2020

Wozzeck’s depiction of the impact of war and inequality on the lives of the poor is timelier than ever.

Sleepy LaBeef, country boogie-woogie musician and singer, dies at 84

Including an interview from 1996

By David Walsh, 3 January 2020

Sleepy LaBeef, singer and musician, died the day after Christmas at his home in Arkansas. The musical world and all of us are poorer for the loss.

Favorite music of 2019

By Hiram Lee and Matthew Brennan, 31 December 2019

It was an especially difficult and challenging year for popular music, dominated by the contradiction between the self-absorption and disorientation of the official musical world and growing signs of global popular opposition.

On the centenary of the composer Mieczysław Weinberg (1919–1996)

By Clara Weiss, 6 December 2019

The music of Polish-Jewish composer Mieczysław Weinberg (1919–1996), who spent much of his life in the Soviet Union, has been recently rediscovered. It counts among the most significant bodies of work produced in the 20th century.

Opera singer Plácido Domingo defends himself against sexual harassment allegations

By David Walsh, 5 December 2019

In an interview with the Spanish online publication El Confidencial, opera legend Domingo explained that these “have been the most difficult months of my life.”

New York City exhibit examines the creation of Verdi’s last two operas

By Fred Mazelis, 16 October 2019

Otello and Falstaff, from the last years of the 19th century, continue to amaze contemporary audiences.

Roger Waters “Us + Them” concert film takes on global issues

By Kevin Reed, 11 October 2019

Filmed at a live performance in Amsterdam in June 2018, the concert features Waters’ reinterpretation of the catalog of Pink Floyd and his solo career in light of present social and political crises around the world.

Singer Placido Domingo’s forced departure from New York’s Metropolitan Opera

By David Walsh, 26 September 2019

Domingo’s action came in response to two Associated Press articles, in August and September, in which 20 women, 18 of them anonymously, accused the opera star of inappropriate behavior.

“Go on strike ‘til you get it right!”

Detroit rapper GmacCash supports striking autoworkers

By Kathleen Martin, 21 September 2019

The former autoworker spoke to the WSWS Autoworker Newsletter about life in the auto plants and why he supports the striking workers.

Bill Frisell speaks with WSWS: “Music is like a teacher who opens your eyes to many things”

By Richard Phillips, 23 August 2019

Virtuoso jazz guitarist Bill Frisell discussed some of the conceptions underpinning his musical approach and his forthcoming album during the Australian leg of his recent Asian tour.

The newest #MeToo atrocity: Opera singer Plácido Domingo comes under attack

By David Walsh, 17 August 2019

On August 13, the Associated Press posted an article by Jocelyn Gecker alleging that Spanish opera singer Plácido Domingo had sexually harassed a number of women over a period of several decades.

South African jazz musician Abdullah Ibrahim returns with The Balance

By Hiram Lee, 7 August 2019

This latest work stands out as an unusually open and humane collection of songs in a genre that has been lacking in those elements far too much in recent years.

The 2008 music vault fire

Universal Music Group coverup continues in response to artists’ class-action lawsuit

By Kevin Reed, 30 July 2019

The social and legal fallout from the June 2008 music vault fire in Hollywood, which destroyed an invaluable popular music archive at Universal Studios and which Universal Music Group (UMG) covered up for years, is ongoing.

Bossa Nova pioneer, songwriter and musician João Gilberto dead at 88

By Hiram Lee, 13 July 2019

Together with the composer Antônio Carlos Jobim, Gilberto pioneered a “new wave” in Brazilian popular music during the mid-to-late 1950s that had a worldwide impact.

Amazing Grace: A film about American singer Aretha Franklin’s most popular album

By Matthew Brennan, 3 June 2019

Amazing Grace, a concert film currently showing in select theaters around the US, captures the two-day recording of singer-pianist Aretha Franklin’s 1972 gospel concert album of the same title.

Michigan State University performs stirring rendition of Babi Yar, Dmitri Shostakovich’s anti-fascist symphony

By Nancy Hanover, 1 May 2019

Shostakovich’s masterpiece was performed by the Michigan State Symphony Orchestra, the University Chorale, the State Singers, noted baritone Mark Rucker and conductor Christopher James Lees at Detroit’s Orchestra Hall on April 27-28.

Singer-songwriter Scott Walker (1943-2019): A gifted and intriguing artist

By Matthew Brennan, 22 April 2019

Best known as a member of the 1960s pop trio the Walker Brothers, Scott Walker became an elusive and yet influential figure in the rock and electronic music genres in later years.

Legendary “Wrecking Crew” drummer Hal Blaine dead at 90

By Hiram Lee, 19 March 2019

Drummer Hal Blaine died March 11, one month past his 90th birthday. Blaine was an incredibly prolific studio musician who appeared on countless recordings during the 1960s and 1970s.

“This is not just about Tchaikovsky, it’s about culture as a whole”

Chicago Symphony Orchestra musicians strike to defend pensions

By Kristina Betinis, 12 March 2019

CSO players and supporters demand funding for the arts, not wars.

Alleging “Russian influence,” Facebook bans left-wing pages

By Andy Thompson, 20 February 2019

Facebook suspended four pages run by Maffick Media, including In the Now, Soapbox, Back Then and Waste-Ed, which posted content critical of US foreign and social policy.

The 2019 Grammy Awards: The music industry’s love affair with itself

By Matthew Brennan, 14 February 2019

The now ubiquitous and mandatory theme of every awards show—identity politics—was on heavy display Sunday.

Leyla McCalla’s Capitalist Blues: Keeping one’s eyes open

By Matthew Brennan, 2 February 2019

Trained as a classical cellist, McCalla’s eventual decision to pursue folk-based music and song-writing led her to the rich New Orleans music environment where she has been a fixture for much of the past decade.

Musical highlights of 2018

By Matthew Brennan and Hiram Lee, 31 December 2018

Many of the year’s best musicians refused to limit themselves to one “lane,” “border,” genre or supposedly separate culture.

“I am a poet who has the ability to sing his poems” – Charles Aznavour (1924-2018)

By Paul Bond, 6 October 2018

Aznavour grew up with a love of music and theatre and leaves a legacy of some 1,200 songs, innumerable recordings, and some notable film appearances.

There was far more to Leonard Bernstein than mere charisma

By Fred Mazelis, 25 September 2018

New Yorker music critic Alex Ross claims that Bernstein’s legacy is being exaggerated.

Young Euro Classic 2018—a display of boundless musical virtuosity and symphonic poetry

By Verena Nees, 3 September 2018

The 20 nearly sold-out concerts by international youth orchestras struck a clear musical counterpoint to the xenophobic and nationalist policies of the global political elites.

One of the greatest musical figures of the 20th century

The centenary of Leonard Bernstein—Part 2

By Fred Mazelis, 25 August 2018

There was no one else who combined Bernstein’s genius as a composer, conductor, educator and pianist.

One of the greatest musical figures of the 20th century

The centenary of Leonard Bernstein—Part 1

By Fred Mazelis, 24 August 2018

There was no one else who combined Bernstein’s genius as a composer, conductor, educator and pianist.

Aretha Franklin (1942-2018)—A tribute to the Queen of Soul

By Hiram Lee, 18 August 2018

Legendary soul singer Aretha Franklin died August 16 at the age of 76. She was a major figure, one of the great performers of the second half of the twentieth century.

Acoustic Classics—the new old songs of Rodney Crowell

By Hiram Lee, 15 August 2018

On his new album Acoustic Classics, country singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell revisits a selection of his songs in new stripped-down all acoustic recordings.

Jazz goes country—the music of Charles Lloyd and Lucinda Williams

By Hiram Lee, 7 August 2018

Vanished Gardens, a new collaboration between jazz musician Charles Lloyd and country singer Lucinda Williams, is a seamless and enjoyable blend of multiple genres of music.

David Byrne’s American Utopia: Fighting difficulties with false cheerfulness

By Matthew MacEgan, 27 July 2018

The album is intended to be the musical component of a larger multimedia project entitled Reasons to Be Cheerful, which is an attempt at spreading “positivity” in the wake of the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency.

Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You: A “ladder-climber” in the corporate world

By Matthew Brennan, 25 July 2018

The film is a dark comedy written and directed by Boots Riley, artist, political activist and rapper from Oakland, California. He is best-known as a longtime member of the music group The Coup.

Punk bassist Steve Soto dead at 54

By Josh Varlin, 10 July 2018

Soto was best known for his work with the seminal hardcore punk band Adolescents.

Donald Glover’s hit music video “This is America”

By Zac Corrigan, 1 June 2018

Within 24 hours, “This is America” had been viewed 12.9 million times and the song debuted at #1 on the Billboard chart. It has now been viewed more than 200 million times.

Rapper Kendrick Lamar wins the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Music

By Hiram Lee, 28 May 2018

Pulitzer’s choice to recognize the rapper cannot be viewed as anything but a nod to identity politics and the Democratic Party.

Music streaming service Spotify initiates censorship against R. Kelly and XXXTentacion

By Zac Corrigan, 19 May 2018

Spotify inaugurated its “Hate Content & Hateful Conduct” policy by censoring the two singers based on allegations of “sexual violence.” Competitors Apple Music and Pandora Radio followed suit.

The Jazz Ambassadors: An episode in the history of the American musical form

By Fred Mazelis, 14 May 2018

US foreign policy officials concluded that “jazz could give America an edge in the Cold War,” with mostly African-American musicians, “serv[ing] as Cold War cultural ambassadors.”

Interview with conductor William Barkhymer: “I think the world is just thankful we had Gershwin to compose Porgy and Bess

By Barry Grey, 25 April 2018

“For me, Porgy and Bess is about a community, the people, how they interact with each other, how they hold together in good times and bad times.”

The death of rapper-producer Alias and the fate of “avant-garde” hip hop

By Nick Barrickman, 13 April 2018

Brendon Whitney (“Alias”) was a founding member of the experimental hip hop/electronic music label Anticon.

May Your Kindness Remain from Courtney Marie Andrews

By Matthew Brennan, 23 March 2018

The new album from 27-year-old country singer Courtney Marie Andrews is a sensitive look at the lives of ordinary people struggling to stay afloat.

Evolve by Imagine Dragons: Noisy emotion without artistic depth

By Ed Hightower, 23 March 2018

The latest album by Imagine Dragons is part of a self-pitying and overwrought trend in pop music.

“A world without nations”—On the death of German jazz guitarist Coco Schumann

By Bernd Reinhardt, 2 March 2018

The German jazz guitarist Coco Schumann remained active musically until near the end of his life. He ranks as a jazz musician with one of the longest musical biographies ever.

“This is a great loss for both the community of San Diego and Tijuana”

Baja California and San Diego lose sole classical music station

By Norisa Diaz, 1 March 2018

The popular station was eventually forced off the air yesterday after struggling financially for over a decade.

Bill Frisell: A Portrait—an intimate documentary about a unique guitarist

By Richard Phillips, 23 February 2018

Emma Franz’s film is a fascinating overview of Frisell’s creative work and his constant search for new musical challenges.

A conversation with Emma Franz, director of Bill Frisell: A Portrait

By Richard Phillips, 23 February 2018

Filmmaker and musician Emma Franz speaks about her latest documentary and the political and artistic conceptions that informed her approach.

Colors: Beck’s foray into mainstream pop

By Jay James, 5 February 2018

The 11 albums Beck released prior to Colors blended a dizzying array of genres, resulting in a series of psychedelic funk, soul, folk, hip-hop and and rock-infused anthems that have consistently topped the charts.

Robert Mann (1920-2018), founder of the Juilliard String Quartet

By Fred Mazelis, 10 January 2018

Mann championed the collaborative musical form of the string quartet, and helped train generations of famed musicians.

Pop and jazz in 2017

By Hiram Lee, Matthew Brennan and Nick Barrickman, 30 December 2017

With a few exceptions, the top of the Billboard charts in 2017 was home to one conformist and forgettable album after another, or worse.

One hundred years since the birth of Romanian pianist and composer Dinu Lipatti

By Clara Weiss, 20 December 2017

Lipatti left a legacy of outstanding recordings of the major works of classical music, and is justly considered one of the greatest musicians of the twentieth century.

Dover Quartet recital offers unusual program, including works by “forgotten composers” Viktor Ullmann and Szymon Laks

By Fred Mazelis, 18 December 2017

The youthful quartet played chamber music in New York November 18, composed in the darkest days of the Holocaust, bearing witness against fascist barbarism.

Dmitri Hvorostovsky (1962-2017), one of opera’s greatest baritones

By Fred Mazelis, 11 December 2017

The Siberian-born singer, who was known especially for his Verdi and Tchaikovsky roles, had performed in nearly every major opera house in the world.

The Spark: UK band Enter Shikari at an artistic cross-roads

By Ben Trent, 18 November 2017

With the new album, the band is attempting to navigate their way through an increasingly fraught political and social atmosphere and to encourage an alternative.

The death of rapper Lil Peep and the tragedy of youth

By Nick Barrickman, 18 November 2017

Lil Peep, who died November 15 of a drug overdose while on tour, had come to be seen as the foremost representative of the genre-bending musical style known as “emo rap.”

Remembering Fats Domino

By Hiram Lee, 4 November 2017

Rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Fats Domino died October 24 at the age of 89. The gifted pianist was second only to Elvis Presley in popularity during the early days of the genre.

Memories… Do Not Open by The Chainsmokers

By Ed Hightower, 30 October 2017

The full-length debut of Electronic Dance Music duo The Chainsmokers, which features an appearance by Coldplay, is a mostly shallow party record.

Rapper Cardi B (“Bodak Yellow”) celebrated as a feminist icon

By Hiram Lee, 9 October 2017

In truth, “Bodak Yellow” is a vulgar work that glorifies backward and genuinely anti-social impulses.

On the loss of Tom Petty

By Hiram Lee, 5 October 2017

Tom Petty died suddenly October 2 at the age of 66. He was a genuine and unpretentious songwriter and performer.

Sidemen: Long Road to Glory—A heartfelt tribute to three bluesmen

By James Brewer, 21 September 2017

Scott D. Rosenbaum’s film documents the lives of three blues musicians whose talents graced the bands of Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf.

Randy Newman and the problems of Dark Matter

By Hiram Lee, 24 August 2017

The latest album by songwriter Randy Newman satirizes Vladimir Putin, the Bay of Pigs invasion and the conflict between science and religion.

“The night our eyes changed”

Five musical responses to the Grenfell Tower inferno

By Paul Bond, 16 August 2017

Music mogul Simon Cowell brought together high-profile figures for a cover of Simon and Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water, but a far more powerful and politically interesting response has come from local artists.

DL Menard (1932-2017): The voice of Cajun music

By Paul Bond, 2 August 2017

The revival of the fortunes of traditional Cajun music owes much to Menard’s love of country music, and his warmly nasal voice.

Jay-Z’s 4:44: A further display of hubris and self-absorption

By Nick Barrickman, 24 July 2017

Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter’s 4:44, released June 30 on his Roc Nation label and available through Carter’s streaming service Tidal, is the rapper and entrepreneur’s thirteenth studio album.

Roger Waters’ Is This the Life We Really Want?: An angry, depressed protest against war and nationalism

By Kevin Reed, 9 June 2017

In 12 tracks and 55 minutes, Waters paints a picture of a desperate world and he issues an angry protest—if also a disheartened outburst—against the things that make it so.

The case of punk duo PWR BTTM: The erosion of democratic rights in pop culture

By Norisa Diaz, 5 June 2017

The New York-based band has been banished from the music industry following social media allegations of sexual assault, undermining the long-standing legal principle that the accused is presumed “innocent until proven guilty.”

Singer-musician Chris Cornell (1964-2017) dies at 52

By Adam Soroka, 22 May 2017

Cornell (born July 20, 1964 in Seattle, Washington) will be best remembered as the lead vocalist of the Seattle metal band Soundgarden. His vocals combined an R&B sensibility with a dynamic, multi-octave range.

Musician-singer Valerie June’s The Order Of Time: A warm album, but …

By Matthew Brennan, 18 May 2017

The album is June’s first proper release since the 2013 album Pushing Against a Stone, which made her a nationally known artist in the US.

On the Freedom Highway with Rhiannon Giddens

By Hiram Lee, 15 April 2017

Folk singer Rhiannon Giddens’ latest album will almost certainly be counted among the best of this year.

Rock ’n’ roll great Chuck Berry dead at 90

By Hiram Lee, 23 March 2017

It would be difficult to overstate Berry’s influence on American popular music in the second half of the 20th century. Perhaps more than any other artist in the genre, he defined the sound of rock ’n’ roll.

Why is the Flaming Lips’ Oczy Mlody so disappointing?

By Hiram Lee, 27 February 2017

Indie rock veterans The Flaming Lips have returned with a new album of mostly detached psychedelia.

Daniel Barenboim conducts the Bruckner symphony cycle in New York

By Fred Mazelis, 20 February 2017

A late 19th century composer who has some detractors gets his big moment at Carnegie Hall.

Columnist Myles E. Johnson on Beyoncé at the Grammys

The New York Times opens its pages to frenzied racialism

By David Walsh, 16 February 2017

The February 14 op-ed piece in the Times by Myles E. Johnson (“What Beyoncé Won Was Bigger Than a Grammy”) is an especially repugnant example of racialism.