History of Science

Albert Einstein’s life, or parts of it, in the first season of National Geographic’s Genius

By Bryan Dyne, 20 July 2017

The 10-episode season depicts the life of one of the most renowned scientists in world history without paying much attention to the science he developed.

100 years of General Relativity—Part Three

By Bryan Dyne, 9 December 2015

This is the last part of a three-part series examining the history, science and implications of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

100 years of General Relativity—Part Two

By Will Morrow, 8 December 2015

This is the second of a three-part series examining the history, science and lasting implications of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which remains, along with his special theory, one of the central pillars of modern physics.

100 years of General Relativity—Part One

By Don Barrett, 7 December 2015

This is the first of a three-part series examining the history, science and implications of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

New Horizons spacecraft prepares for Pluto flyby

By Bryan Dyne, 8 July 2015

Pluto, a world too small and distant to be seen in detail even with Earth’s best telescopes, is the farthest object explored by a space probe.

Twenty-five years of the Hubble Space Telescope

By Bryan Dyne, 24 April 2015

While it is a public relations boon for NASA, Hubble's true importance lies in its continued and vast contributions to astronomy.

Capitalism and the space program

By Don Barrett, 12 November 2014

Technical limitations cannot explain the failure of mankind to maintain a constant tempo of more and more ambitious explorations throughout the solar system and into interstellar space.

The beginning of modern physics

By Henry Allan and Bryan Dyne, 9 September 2014

David Whitehouse’s Renaissance Genius: Galileo Galilei and His Legacy to Modern Science, provides a human portrait of Galileo, his times and his role in the advancement and popularization of science.

An exchange on “One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis”

28 July 2005

The following is an exchange on the four-part series entitled “One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis”.

Letters, and some replies, on “One hundred years since Einstein’s annus mirabilis”

26 July 2005

The following letters, in some cases with replies, were sent in response to the four-part series entitled “One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis” by Peter Symonds. The articles were posted as follows: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis

Part 4

By Peter Symonds, 14 July 2005

This is the conclusion of a four-part series on Einstein’s scientific contributions. Part one, part two, and part three were published on July 11, 12 and 13, respectively.

One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis

Part 3

By Peter Symonds, 13 July 2005

This is the third part of a four-part series on Einstein’s scientific contributions. Part one was published on July 11 and part two on July 12. Part four will be published on July 14.

One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis

Part 2

By Peter Symonds, 12 July 2005

This is the second part of a four-part series on Einstein’s scientific contributions. Part one was published on July 11. Parts three and four will be published on July 13 and 14 respectively.

One hundred years since Albert Einstein’s annus mirabilis

Part 1

By Peter Symonds, 11 July 2005

This is the first part of a four-part series on Einstein’s scientific contributions. Parts two, three andfour will be published on July 12, 13 and 14 respectively.

Isaac Newton's papers up for sale

By Ann Talbot, 26 September 2000

A collection of Sir Isaac Newton's papers has been put up for sale, in what is probably the most important auction of scientific manuscripts for 70 years. The papers date from 1669, the most productive period in Newton's life, when he was developing his calculus and his theories of gravity and optics.