2007 SEP Summer School: The Left Opposition and the Founding of the Fourth International

Lecture 2

“Socialism in One Country” and the Soviet economic debates of the 1920s—Part 2

By Nick Beams, 7 May 2009

This is the second of two lectures delivered at an SEP summer school in August 2007 that deal with some of the crucial conflicts over economic policy in the Soviet Union during the 1920s.

Lecture 2

“Socialism in One Country” and the Soviet economic debates of the 1920s

By Nick Beams, 6 May 2009

This is the second of two lectures delivered at an SEP summer school in August 2007 that deal with some of the crucial conflicts over economic policy in the Soviet Union during the 1920s.

“Socialism in One Country” and the Soviet economic debates of the 1920s—Part 2

By Nick Beams, 5 May 2009

This is the first of two lectures, delivered at an SEP summer school in August 2007, dealing with some of the crucial conflicts over economic policy in the Soviet Union during the 1920s.

“Socialism in One Country” and the Soviet economic debates of the 1920s

By Nick Beams, 4 May 2009

This is the first of two lectures, delivered at an SEP summer school in August 2007, dealing with some of the crucial conflicts over economic policy in the Soviet Union during the 1920s

The struggle against centrism and the founding of the Fourth International

Part three

By Bill Van Auken, 17 April 2009

There is perhaps no part of the political and theoretical heritage left by Trotsky that has been the object of more sustained and diverse attacks and revisions on the part of the centrists than the conception of transitional demands.

The struggle against centrism and the founding of the Fourth International

Part two

By Bill Van Auken, 16 April 2009

The tragic consequences of the attempt to steer a middle course between revolutionary Marxism on the one hand and Stalinism and Social Democracy on the other found full expression in the equivocal policy of Andres Nin and the POUM in Spain, which contributed decisively to the strangling of the Spanish revolution.

The struggle against centrism and the founding of the Fourth International

By Bill Van Auken, 15 April 2009

The five years between Trotsky’s call for the Fourth International in 1933 and the holding of a founding conference in 1938 were marked by a continuous struggle against a wide range of centrist political organizations active during this period, particularly in Europe , many of which professed sympathy with Trotsky’s perspective and some of which declared themselves for the Fourth International.

The Revolution Betrayed and the fate of the Soviet Union

By Peter Daniels, 26 February 2009

An understanding the Russian Revolution and the Soviet state—their rise and subsequent degeneration—is critical in politically arming the working class by learning the lessons of the twentieth century in order to prepare for the struggles of the twenty-first.

The Revolution Betrayed and the fate of the Soviet Union

By Peter Daniels, 25 February 2009

An understanding of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet state—their rise and subsequent degeneration—is critical in politically arming the working class by learning the lessons of the 20th century in order to prepare for the struggles of the 21st.

The Spanish Civil War and the Popular Front

Part two

By Ann Talbot, 27 January 2009

In Spain, Trotsky wrote, two irreconcilable programmes confronted one another. There was the programme that consisted of “saving at any cost private property from the proletariat, and saving as far as possible, democracy from Franco; and on the other hand, the programme of abolishing private property through the conquest of power by the proletariat.

The Spanish Civil War and the Popular Front

By Ann Talbot, 26 January 2009

The Soviet intervention in Spain can best be understood as an attempt to strangle a developing revolution, to physically liquidate its leading representatives, terrorize wider layers of workers and peasants and prevent their spontaneous revolutionary strivings from acquiring a more politically conscious form.

The tragedy of the 1925-1927 Chinese Revolution

Part 3

By John Chan, 7 January 2009

The rise and fall of the 1925-1927 Second Chinese Revolution was one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century. One cannot understand modern Chinese history without examining its lessons.

The tragedy of the 1925-1927 Chinese Revolution

Part 2

By John Chan, 6 January 2009

The rise and fall of the 1925-1927 Second Chinese Revolution was one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century. One cannot understand modern Chinese history without examining its lessons.

The tragedy of the 1925-1927 Chinese Revolution

By John Chan, 5 January 2009

The rise and fall of the 1925-1927 Second Chinese Revolution was one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century. One cannot understand modern Chinese history without examining its lessons.

The tragedy of the 1925-1927 Chinese Revolution

Part 1

By John Chan, 5 January 2009

The rise and fall of the 1925-1927 Second Chinese Revolution was one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century. One cannot understand modern Chinese history without examining its lessons.

Stalin, Trotsky and the 1926 British general strike

Part Three

By Chris Marsden, 30 December 2008

Trotsky had argued that the very survival of British imperialism now rested not on the right-wing social democrats, but on the supposed lefts, without whom the right wing could not maintain its position in the labour movement.

Stalin, Trotsky and the 1926 British general strike

Part Two

By Chris Marsden, 29 December 2008

Bereft of any revolutionary guidance from the Communist Party of Great Britain, the working class had no possibility of arming itself against the role of the lefts who were being continually boosted under the Comintern’s orders.

Stalin, Trotsky and the 1926 British general strike

By Chris Marsden, 27 December 2008

More than 80 years on, the May 1926 British General Strike remains a defining moment in the history of the workers’ movement. Its lessons are essential for the development of a revolutionary strategy, not just in Britain but the world over.

The German October: The missed revolution of 1923

Part 3

By Peter Schwarz, 1 November 2008

Eighty-five years ago, in October 1923, the German Communist Party prepared an insurrection and then cancelled it at the last minute, prompting Leon Trotsky to characterize it as “a classic demonstration of how it is possible to miss a perfectly exceptional revolutionary situation of world-historic importance.”

The German October: The missed revolution of 1923

Part 2

By Peter Schwarz, 31 October 2008

Eighty-five years ago, in October 1923, the German Communist Party prepared an insurrection and then cancelled it at the last minute, prompting Leon Trotsky to characterize it as “a classic demonstration of how it is possible to miss a perfectly exceptional revolutionary situation of world-historic importance.”

The German October: The missed revolution of 1923

By Peter Schwarz, 30 October 2008

In October 1923, the German Communist Party prepared an insurrection and then cancelled it at the last minute, prompting Leon Trotsky to characterize it as “a classic demonstration of how it is possible to miss a perfectly exceptional revolutionary situation of world-historic importance.”