Anthropology and Archaeology

Stunning discovery of pre-human fossil skull in Ethiopia

By Frank Gaglioti, 19 September 2019

As a near complete skull 3.8 million years old, the find opens the road to future research that will allow scientists to look back to more primitive species, while being able to reassess the transition to true humans.

New human species discovered in the Philippines

By Frank Gaglioti, 21 August 2019

The latest find adds to our knowledge of the complex evolutionary path of human-like species and fills an important gap in our understanding.

Evidence of early rice domestication found in southern China

By Philip Guelpa, 25 July 2017

The process of rice domestication by humans involved a range of social and technological adjustments associated with increasing reliance on a particular food source.

Evolutionary divergence between apes and humans may have occurred in Europe, not Africa

By Philip Guelpa, 8 June 2017

Fossil specimens from Greece and Bulgaria may represent very early members of the hominin lineage.

New dating of Homo naledi fossil alters its position in the human evolutionary tree

By Philip Guelpa, 19 May 2017

A South African fossil hominin raises many intriguing questions about how the dialectic of technology, environment, and physical and intellectual development played out in human evolution.

Researchers claim evidence that humans were in the Americas 130,000 years ago

By Matthew MacEgan, 1 May 2017

This claim is receiving wide attention because it is 115,000 years earlier than any date previously suggested for the peopling of the western hemisphere, based on existing evidence.

New fossil discovery may date origin of life on Earth earlier than previously known

By Philip Guelpa, 27 September 2016

The discovery of what appear to be stromatolites dating to 3.7 billion years ago in southwestern Greenland suggests that life first evolved in the first 500 million years after Earth’s formation.

New technologies expand knowledge of early art in North America

By Matthew MacEgan, 29 February 2016

Early art produced more than 8,000 years ago has been identified in several states and provinces in Canada, the United States and Mexico by using new photographic technology.

The use of archaeology in Jerusalem as a political weapon

By Matthew MacEgan, 14 August 2014

The actions taken by some Israeli archaeologists operating in East Jerusalem have been heavily criticized for using a selective view of history in order to marginalize local Palestinian communities and drive them from their homes.

Stone tools and the evolution of modern human cognition

By Philip Guelpa, 18 December 2012

A newly reported microlithic technology from a site in South Africa helps close the apparent temporal gap between the biological evolution of modern humans and the archaeological evidence of fully modern cognitive abilities.

The uncertain future of Pompeii’s extraordinary ruins

By Mark Church, 6 March 2012

The ancient Roman town is in great danger due to years of under-funding and over-exploitation, producing widespread degradation and the collapse of ruins.

New hominin fossil finds in South Africa may fill a gap in the record of human evolution

By Philip Guelpa, 23 September 2011

A newly reported fossil discovery from the Malapa, South Africa may provide greater insight into the evolution of the genus Homo from our australopithecine ancestors. The fossils consist of remains of two individuals, an adult female and juvenile male, possibly a mother and son.

Mass Viking grave identified in southern England

By Joan Smith, 16 September 2011

Archaeologists have discovered a mass grave of decapitated Vikings on the southern coast of England dating from AD 910-AD1034. Scientists think they may have been caught and killed by locals.

Scientists find evidence of cannibalism in Palaeolithic Britain

By Joan Smith, 29 April 2011

The alternation of glacial and warmer periods conditioned the prehistory of what is now Britain.

UNESCO Report on Babylon

US occupation caused “major damage” to historic site in Iraq

By Sandy English, 11 August 2009

UNESCO, the United Nations cultural organization, has issued a report outlining the extensive damage caused by US occupation forces in Iraq to the archeological site of ancient Babylon.