Film Reviews

Toronto International Film Festival 2017: Part 2

Directions, Disappearance, The Drowning Man: Realistic about harsh conditions

By David Walsh, 26 September 2017

Certain films at the recent Toronto film festival depict reality in important ways.

Toronto International Film Festival 2017

An interview with Stephan Komandarev, director of Directions: “The first step is to have a clear picture of what’s happening. I don’t see any other way.”

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 26 September 2017

We spoke with Bulgarian filmmaker Stephan Komandarev, the writer-director of Directions, in Toronto.

Toronto International Film Festival 2017: Part 1

Trouble in paradise: A comment on the economics and politics of the Toronto International Film Festival

By David Walsh, 22 September 2017

This year’s event screened 255 feature films, a 14 percent decline from a year ago, when the festival presented 296 features, and the lowest number of full-length films in a decade.

The Last Tycoon: Hollywood in the 1930s

By David Walsh, 13 September 2017

The Last Tycoon is an American television series about Hollywood and the film industry in the 1930s. The first and last season of the series, which emanates from Amazon Studios, comprises nine episodes.

Sean Penn’s The Last Face and Hollywood’s “August Death March”

By David Walsh, 31 August 2017

The Last Face, about relief workers in Africa, met with a savage critical response at the Cannes film festival. Meanwhile, the American film industry is deservedly suffering through one of its worst summers in decades.

Ingrid Goes West and Wind River: Hardly scratching the surface

By Joanne Laurier, 30 August 2017

Two current films, Ingrid Goes West, a cautionary tale about social media, and Wind River, a murder investigation near a Native American reservation, skirt around significant issues.

Logan Lucky: Steven Soderbergh returns from retirement

By David Walsh, 26 August 2017

The new film is set in West Virginia and North Carolina and involves the robbery of the Charlotte Motor Speedway during a major race.

Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology—A largely untold story

By Charles Bogle, 17 August 2017

This collection samples the work of 14 early women directors (1902-1943). International in scope, the anthology brings to light the important contributions that these directors made to the development of film as an art form.

Rescue Under Fire (Zona hostil): Propaganda in the service of Spanish militarism

By Alejandro López, 14 August 2017

The glorification of the military is a response to the growing inter-imperialist tensions and the drive to war, which have been intensified by the installation of an aggressively nationalist and protectionist administration in the US.

Barbet Schroeder’s Amnesia: The trauma of German history

By Joanne Laurier, 7 August 2017

Set in the early 1990s, Amnesia is an exploration of German historical memory and the impact of the legacy of Nazism on sections of the middle class after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Atomic Blonde: The last days of the Cold War

By Kevin Martinez, 5 August 2017

In 1989, before the fall of the Berlin Wall, MI6 agent Lorraine Broughton is sent to retrieve a secret list hidden in a wristwatch that has the names of every active agent in the Soviet Union.

The Handmaid’s Tale: Resistance is not futile

By Ed Hightower, 1 August 2017

In a number of ways, Hulu’s serialization of Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel challenges the viewer to oppose the status quo.

Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit: Mind-numbing violence and racial politics

By Joanne Laurier, 28 July 2017

Bigelow’s film is a fictionalized account of an incident that occurred during the July 1967 rebellion in Detroit, the cold-blooded murder of three young black men by police at the Algiers Motel.

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City—Documentary on the life and times of urban activist Jane Jacobs

By Clare Hurley, 27 July 2017

The subject of Matt Tyrnauer’s documentary is journalist and activist Jane Jacobs, perhaps best known for her crusades against several large-scale infrastructure projects in New York City in the 1960s.

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk: The outbreak of World War II without history or politics

By David Walsh, 26 July 2017

British director Nolan’s new film is about the famed evacuation of large numbers of British and French troops from northern France in May-June 1940.

Lady Macbeth—a bored, unhappy young wife “ready to go through fire”—and Mali Blues

By Joanne Laurier, 17 July 2017

Lady Macbeth is an adaptation of the well-known novella by Russian writer Nikolai Leskov, transposed to northeast England. Mali Blues offers a glimpse of that country’s remarkable musical scene.

Netflix series on Elizabeth II

The Crown: Sentenced to be queen

By David Walsh, 13 July 2017

The Crown is a biographical drama series, created and written by Peter Morgan (The Queen, The Damned United), about the life and reign of Queen Elizabeth II. The first season covers the years 1947 to 1955.

Beatriz at Dinner: Not the sort of resistance that amounts to much

By Joanne Laurier, 12 July 2017

Directed by Miguel Arteta (Cedar Rapids) and featuring Salma Hayek and John Lithgow, the new film promotes a New Age-type opposition to a Trump-like figure.

Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled: Historical drama with hardly any history

By Joanne Laurier, 7 July 2017

Along the way, the film demonstrates once again how contemporary gender and racial politics tyrannizes over much of current cultural life.

The Jazz Loft According to W. Eugene Smith: A film about music, photography and the postwar world

By David Walsh, 27 June 2017

Between 1957 and 1965 or so, American photographer Eugene Smith took some 40,000 photos and recorded nearly 4,000 hours of audio tape, many dedicated to jazz and jazz musicians, in a New York City loft.

Megan Leavey: Oblivious to Iraqi suffering

By Joanne Laurier, 23 June 2017

Set during the Iraq war in 2006, Megan Leavey deals with the relationship of a female Marine corporal and her military dog companion. It is an unvarnished pro-war film.

My Cousin Rachel: Was she innocent or guilty—and what would it signify?

By David Walsh, 17 June 2017

Roger Michell’s film, based on the 1951 novel by Daphne du Maurier set in the 19th century, follows a callow young man who falls for his sophisticated, perhaps calculating older “cousin.”

Wonder Woman: Humanity is pretty rotten, but the Germans are the worst of the lot

By David Walsh, 13 June 2017

The story involves an Amazonian princess/demigoddess who makes her way, in the company of an American Allied spy, from her island paradise to Europe toward the end of the First World War.

Three intriguing new films that should not disappear unnoticed: Sami Blood, Past Life and Radio Dreams

By David Walsh, 10 June 2017

Most of the films in movie theaters in the US at the moment are poor, or worse. As a result, the public is increasingly turning away. But there are exceptions.

Silence in the Courts—a film about judicial corruption in Sri Lanka

By Wasantha Rupasinghe, 3 June 2017

Prasanna Vithanage’s documentary deals with the sexual assault of two village women by a magistrate and the subsequent cover-up.

Barry Levinson’s The Wizard of Lies on HBO: The tame, New York Times’ version of the Madoff scandal

By David Walsh, 1 June 2017

The HBO film is an account of the downfall of Wall Street swindler Bernard Madoff, whose multi-billion-dollar stock and securities fraud unraveled in December 2008.

Conversations with Joseph Goebbels’s secretary

A German Life: A glimpse into the Nazi inner circle

By Bernd Reinhardt and Verena Nees, 27 May 2017

The Austrian-made documentary centres on Brunhilde Pomsel (1911-2017), who worked as a secretary in the office of Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels from 1942 to 1945.

ABC’s Designated Survivor: The US government in crisis, onscreen and off

By Carlos Delgado, 20 May 2017

The series stars Kiefer Sutherland as Tom Kirkman, a low-level cabinet member who ascends to the presidency after a devastating attack on the US government.

Risk: Laura Poitras’ confused, superficial documentary about Julian Assange and WikiLeaks

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 11 May 2017

The film broaches a dozen subjects and avoids treating any of them in depth, and often fails to take a clear position of any kind.

13 Reasons Why: The unhappiness of youth

By Genevieve Leigh, 10 May 2017

The new Netflix series treats the background to the decision by Hannah Baker, a high school student in a more or less average American suburb, to kill herself…and its consequences.

San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 4

Dziga Vertov’s The Man with a Movie Camera: One of the films you must see!

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 6 May 2017

A highlight of the recent San Francisco film festival was the screening of Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov’s masterpiece, The Man with a Movie Camera (1929), at the historic Castro Theatre.

National Bird, about drone warfare, currently available on PBS “Independent Lens”

By Joanne Laurier, 5 May 2017

Sonia Kennebeck’s disturbing documentary, National Bird, can be viewed until May 16 on PBS’s “Independent Lens” web site.

San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 1

By David Walsh, 26 April 2017

The 2017 San Francisco International Film Festival screened some 180 films from 50 countries or so. This is the first of several articles.

Edward Yang’s Taipei Story (1985) depicts a city of sadness and alienation

By Fred Mazelis, 18 April 2017

One of the early films of major Taiwanese director Edward Yang was recently screened in the US for the first time.

The Coming War on China: A pacifist appeal

By Richard Phillips, 14 April 2017

Pilger’s documentary exposes something of Washington’s escalating war plans against China but suggests that protests can prevent a nuclear conflagration.

“Nothing is entirely serious”—least of all Pablo Larraín’s Neruda

By Emanuele Saccarelli, 12 April 2017

Pablo Larraín’s Neruda is a highly unconventional and dissatisfying biopic of the Chilean poet.

San Diego Latino Film Festival—Part 3

On the assassination of Leon Trotsky, Latin American death squads and pictures of immigration

By Toby Reese, Kevin Martinez and Andrea Ramos, 10 April 2017

El Elegido (The Chosen) dramatizes the role of Ramon Mercader in the assassination of Leon Trotsky in 1940. El Amparo recounts the 1988 massacre of innocent fishermen in Venezuela. Lupe Bajo el Sol and X500 look at immigration and immigrants.

San Diego Latino Film Festival—Part 2

Conditions in Latin America, treated concretely…and more abstractly

By Kevin Martinez and Toby Reese, 6 April 2017

Films from Ecuador, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic were shown at the festival, including a tense political drama, a dialogue-free drama and two documentaries.

The Zookeeper’s Wife: Life and heroism in wartime Warsaw

By Joanne Laurier, 5 April 2017

The Zookeeper’s Wife recounts the true story of the rescue of Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto during the Nazi invasion of Poland that began in 1939.

Lyrical and left-wing film

Nicholas Ray’s They Live by Night (1948): “They’re thieves, just like us”

By Joanne Laurier, 29 March 2017

A viewing of Nicholas Ray’s iconic 1948 film They Live by Night is a refreshing antidote to the current trivia, social indifference and identity politics.

Get Out: The horror of racism, and racialist politics

By Hiram Lee, 28 March 2017

With Get Out, Jordan Peele has said he wanted to make a film to “combat the lie that America had become post-racial.” The monster at the heart of this horror film is racism itself.

Bitter Harvest: Ukrainian nationalist fantasy as film

By Jason Melanovski, 18 March 2017

Russophobia and historical misrepresentation abound in George Mendeluk’s pseudo-historical drama.

Revolution: New Art for a New World—A careless, unserious treatment of Russian Revolutionary art

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 17 March 2017

British filmmaker Margy Kinmonth is out of her depth in her documentary about Russian avant-garde art.

Raoul Peck’s The Young Karl Marx

By Peter Schwarz, 15 March 2017

The Haitian-born director Raoul Peck has set himself the task of presenting the formative years of Marxism in a film, covering the period from the prohibition of the Rheinische Zeitung in March 1843, to the writing of the Communist Manifesto at the end of 1847.

The Settlers: Israel’s movement toward an apartheid state

By Fred Mazelis, 11 March 2017

A new documentary shows the impact of decades of Israeli occupation of the West Bank on the Zionist state.

67th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 3

The absence for the most part of the big wide world: German films at the Berlinale

By Bernd Reinhardt, 9 March 2017

The dramatic social and political developments of the past several years were evidently not high on the German filmmakers’ agenda.

The Look of Silence: Important documentary on the aftermath of the 1965 Indonesia massacres

By Clara Weiss, 6 March 2017

In a profoundly moving, intimate and disturbing way, Joshua Oppenheimer’s film deals with the long-lasting and devastating impact of the mass murder of up to one million Communists and suspected Communists.

67th Berlin International Film Festival--Part 2

A film about the legendary guitarist: Django

By Bernd Reinhardt, 4 March 2017

The debut film of Étienne Comar focuses on the year 1943, when the Nazis tried unsuccessfully to convince Django Reinhardt to undertake a tour of fascist Germany.

67th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 1

Filmmaking in “apocalyptic” times

By Stefan Steinberg, 2 March 2017

There was very little evidence in Berlin this year of filmmakers and the festival as a whole taking up burning social and political issues.

89th Academy Awards: What does Hollywood offer today?

By David Walsh, 28 February 2017

The 89th Academy Awards ceremony, held Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, was an even more complex and peculiar affair than usual.

Zhang Yimou’s The Great Wall: Issues bound up with a major Chinese film production

By Joanne Laurier, 23 February 2017

Set in ancient China, Zhang Yimou’s new work is a visually arresting, large-scale action film undermined by its general cartoonishness.

Pedro Almodóvar’s Julieta: A mother and daughter … and what else?

By Joanne Laurier, 16 February 2017

Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar’s latest film, Julieta, is a family melodrama that seeks to explore themes of guilt, alienation and absence, but with very limited results.

I Am Not Your Negro: Raoul Peck’s documentary on James Baldwin

By Clare Hurley, 14 February 2017

The film takes as its point of departure Baldwin’s proposal to his editor in 1979 to write a piece about civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman

By Tom Carter, 13 February 2017

“Most of the film takes place inside an apartment,” Farhadi told one interviewer, “but once the film has ended, you feel like you’ve seen the whole city.”

Alberto Cavalcanti and postwar British cinema

By Joanne Laurier, 10 February 2017

In the course of a lengthy filmmaking career, Brazilian-born Alberto Cavalcanti created several of the most poetically realistic and socially poignant films of the twentieth century.

Black Mirror: A murky reflection

By Carlos Delgado, 4 February 2017

The science fiction television series purports to show its viewers the dark side of modern technology.

Lion: A former homeless child searches for his town

By George Morley, 3 February 2017

The two-hour feature, about a young Indian-Australian man finding his birth mother, has been nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

The generally lackluster Gold and 20th Century Women

By Joanne Laurier, 1 February 2017

Set in the 1980s, Gold is a fictionalized account of a notorious mining fraud. 20th Century Women is a trite “coming of age” piece located in 1979 California.

Elle: The latest offering from Paul Verhoeven

By David Walsh, 28 January 2017

Dutch-born director Verhoeven’s new film was made in France, and features Isabelle Huppert, who received an Academy Award nomination for her performance.

The Founder: Hollywood’s love affair with Ray Kroc and McDonald's

By Joanne Laurier, 26 January 2017

John Lee Hancock’s The Founder is a biographical drama about Ray Kroc, known as the man who established the McDonald’s global fast food chain.

2017 Academy Award nominations: Hollywood’s “sigh of relief” over racial “diversity”

By David Walsh, 25 January 2017

The media is now so conditioned to treat every major social and cultural phenomenon in racial, ethnic or gender terms that questions of artistic quality or social truthfulness barely receive a mention.

Martin Scorsese’s Silence and Ben Affleck’s Live by Night: Punishment and crime

By Joanne Laurier, 20 January 2017

A nearly three-hour carnival of torture and cruelty, Martin Scorsese’s Silence aims to dramatize the persecution of Catholics in mid-17th-century Japan. Ben Affleck’s Live by Night is a mediocre gangster drama set in the 1920s.

Patriots Day: An ode to law enforcement and repression

By Hiram Lee, 18 January 2017

The latest collaboration of director Peter Berg and actor Mark Wahlberg is a right-wing tribute to law enforcement following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings.

August Wilson’s Fences—an African-American family in mid-20th century Pittsburgh

By Fred Mazelis, 14 January 2017

The film is the first screen adaptation of any of the plays in Wilson’s cycle of 10 spanning the 20th century.

Hidden Figures and Passengers: One official story, and another trite one

By Joanne Laurier, 12 January 2017

Hidden Figures retells the story of three African-American female scientists who made extraordinary contributions to NASA’s aeronautics and space programs in the 1960s. Passengers is a boiler-plate science fiction thriller.

Maren Ade’s award-winning Toni Erdmann: Slaves to modern global business

By Bernd Reinhardt, 9 January 2017

The considerable international success of the German film certainly has something to do with frustrating and bitter experiences of broad sections of the population.

Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson: A tribute to American cities and poetry

By Dorota Niemitz, 3 January 2017

Paterson is a city with a rich social and cultural history. Jarmusch pays homage to its history in his own, idiosyncratic manner.

Best films of 2016

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 31 December 2016

Although technologies have sped up and made possible many things, they cannot by themselves overcome the gap between reality and its artistic assimilation and representation.

Allied: Conventional warfare

By Kevin Martinez, 28 December 2016

Despite its use of exotic locales and beautiful people, this World War II era “romantic thriller” fails to make a lasting—or much of any—impression.

La La Land and Jackie: More American success stories

By Joanne Laurier, 22 December 2016

La La Land is an all-too appropriately titled romantic musical that celebrates Los Angeles as a place where ambitious artists can strike it rich. Jackie is a murky, superficial biographical portrait of Jacqueline Kennedy.

Rogue One: Does it really “stand alone”?

By Matthew MacEgan, 21 December 2016

December 16 saw the release of the first stand-alone Star Wars film. The plot of Rogue One is an exact prequel to the 1977 original.

Miss Sloane and All We Had: Aiming at American life

By Joanne Laurier, 15 December 2016

Miss Sloane presents a fantastical view of Washington’s hired gun world of political lobbyism. Set at the beginning of the 2008 financial crash, All We Had is a limited drama about poverty and homelessness.

Aquarius: Personal resistance and isolation in Brazil

By Miguel Andrade, 13 December 2016

Filmed prior to Brazil’s impeachment crisis, Aquarius has since become an artistic point of reference (and a target) in the continuing political turmoil wracking the country.

From a reader: A second comment on Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight

By Thomas Douglass, 12 December 2016

The authentic and genuinely interesting character of the protagonists is one of Moonlight’s greatest appeals.

Manchester by the Sea: The suffering of an ordinary man

By Joanne Laurier, 10 December 2016

Kenneth Lonergan’s film is a humane examination of the suffering of an ordinary man, whose terrible personal tragedy has emotionally crippled him.

Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today—the 1948 documentary restored

By Clara Weiss, 5 December 2016

The film, written and directed by Stuart Schulberg, was intended to advertise the principles underlying the indictment of the Nazi criminals at the Nuremberg Trials.

The Eagle Huntress is about real people—Rules Don’t Apply and Nocturnal Animals are about something else

By Joanne Laurier, 3 December 2016

The documentary, The Eagle Huntress, follows a cherry-faced 13-year-old Kazakh girl as she learns the art of eagle hunting; Rules Don’t Apply is Warren Beatty’s film about Howard Hughes; and Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals is a violent revenge thriller.

Moonlight: How much can a person be reduced?

By Glenn Mulwray, 30 November 2016

The critically-acclaimed film by Barry Jenkins, about a working-class youth in Miami, seeks to understand a person’s development in fairly narrow terms.

Bleed for This and The Edge of Seventeen: Are these any match for the times?

By Joanne Laurier, 24 November 2016

Bleed for This is a gritty biographical movie about a “blue collar” fighter who makes one of the greatest comebacks in boxing history. A difficult, friendless teenager finds her stride in The Edge of Seventeen.

The “madness” of war dimly understood in Hacksaw Ridge and the world set right by aliens in Arrival

By Joanne Laurier, 17 November 2016

Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge is about the first and only conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor in World War II. Arrival is a feeble science fiction parable from Denis Villeneuve.

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk: Ang Lee on the Iraq war and American hoopla

By David Walsh, 15 November 2016

The drama takes place in 2004. A unit of American soldiers, who have survived a brief but fierce battle with Iraqi insurgents, are being celebrated as “heroes” on a nationwide tour.

Gimme Danger from Jim Jarmusch

By Kevin Martinez, 11 November 2016

American filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has made a documentary on the not so well-known, but hugely influential rock group, The Stooges.

National Bird: “I don’t know how many people I’ve killed,” says US drone pilot

By Joanne Laurier, 9 November 2016

Sonia Kennebeck’s film, whose title suggests that drones should now be considered the US national emblem, is a documentary that brings to the screen the story of three whistleblowers.

USA Network’s Mr. Robot, Season 2: Pessimism overtakes anger, with unfortunate results

By Carlos Delgado, 7 November 2016

After an intriguing start, the second season of the television drama about anti-corporate hackers spirals largely into gloom and incoherence.

Loving: “Tell the court I love my wife…”

By Joanne Laurier, 5 November 2016

Jeff Nichols’ film is a fictional recreation of the landmark case in Virginia in the 1950s and 1960s, which ultimately led to the striking down of state laws banning interracial marriage in the US.

Volhynia (Hatred) by Wojciech Smarzowski—a gripping account of the 1943 massacre

By Dorota Niemitz, 2 November 2016

Volhynia (Hatred) is an honest attempt to recreate the background to the murder of thousands of Poles by right-wing Ukrainian nationalists during World War II.

American Pastoral: A film version of Philip Roth’s novel

By David Walsh, 29 October 2016

The film and novel follow the life and eventual terrible misfortune of Seymour “Swede” Levov, the son of a glove manufacturer in Newark, in the 1960s and 1970s.

Certain Women: A certain anger at America’s coldness, loneliness …

… And Christopher Guest’s Mascots

By Joanne Laurier, 28 October 2016

American filmmaker Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women consists of three vignettes adapted from short stories by Maile Meloy, dealing with emotional malnourishment and disaffection.

Michael Moore in TrumpLand grovels in praise of Hillary Clinton

By Fred Mazelis, 27 October 2016

With his latest effort, Moore emerges as a chief promoter of the favored candidate of Wall Street and the Pentagon.

The Magnificent Seven: Hollywood remakes and the problem of diminishing returns

By Carlos Delgado, 24 October 2016

The film, a remake of the 1960 original, tells the story of a band of hired guns who defend a small town from marauders.

Denial and the assault on historical truth

By Joanne Laurier, 22 October 2016

A fictional account of American academic and author Deborah Lipstadt’s legal battle with British Holocaust denier David Irving in 2000 in London.

The Dressmaker, The Girl on the Train: The “return of the native” and other issues

By Joanne Laurier, 15 October 2016

In The Dressmaker, the art of beautifying the human body is the weapon of choice to vanquish intolerance and ignorance. The Girl on the Train is a murder mystery centered around a New York City suburb.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016—Part 6

Marija, Past Life, Ember: Facing life, in different ways

By David Walsh, 12 October 2016

Marija follows the life of a Ukrainian woman immigrant in Dortmund, Germany. Past Life, set in the 1970s, comes from Israel, and Ember, about a love triangle of sorts, from Turkey.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016

An interview with Michael Koch, director of Marija

By David Walsh, 12 October 2016

At the recent Toronto film festival, WSWS arts editor David Walsh spoke to Michael Koch, writer and director of Marija, about immigrants in Germany, the refugee crisis and other matters.

Werner Herzog’s Lo and Behold: Reveries of The Connected World

Exploring the origins and impact of the Internet

By Kevin Reed, 8 October 2016

The movie examines the origins and implications of the Internet and related technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things and space travel.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016: Part 4

Sami Blood from Sweden, Werewolf from Canada, Park from Greece: Society’s cruelty to its youngest members

By David Walsh, 5 October 2016

Amanda Kernell’s Sami Blood, from Sweden, is not an easy film to watch. It was also one of the most moving and authentic films shown in Toronto this year.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016: Part 3

Loving, The Birth of a Nation: Distinct approaches to historical events

By Joanne Laurier, 1 October 2016

Certain artists are being propelled to consider critical questions, while another group is ever more consumed by identity politics and the pursuit of personal celebrity and wealth.

Clint Eastwood’s Sully: The “Miracle on the Hudson” dramatized

By Joanne Laurier, 28 September 2016

Eastwood directs a fictional version of the January 2009 incident in which pilot Chesley Sullenberger landed a commuter jet in the Hudson River, saving the lives of 155 passengers and crew.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016: Part 1

How well does filmmaking reflect present-day life?

By David Walsh, 27 September 2016

This year’s Toronto International Film Festival screened some 400 feature and short films from 83 countries at 1,200 public screenings.

Oliver Stone’s Snowden: The NSA is “running a dragnet on the whole world”

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 20 September 2016

Veteran American filmmaker Oliver Stone has made a movie about National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden.